Skin Conditions in Babies and Children

What We Treat

Baby Acne

Baby acne looks similar to teenage acne. You’ll see white or red bumps or pimples, which may be surrounded by reddish skin.

Acne usually appears on the cheeks and sometimes on the forehead, the chin, and even the back. It can become more pronounced when your baby is hot or fussy, or if his skin is irritated by saliva, spit-up milk, or fabric that’s a little rough or has been washed in strong detergent. Blemishes on your new baby’s face aren’t necessarily acne, however. Tiny white bumps that are there at birth and disappear within a few weeks are called milia, and they’re not related to acne. If the irritation looks more rashy or scaly than pimply, or it appears elsewhere on your baby’s body, he may have another condition, such as cradle cap or eczema.

What could be causing my baby’s acne?

If a mom takes certain medications while nursing, or if your baby takes certain medications, they might trigger baby acne. And in some cases, a baby is reacting to a skincare product, particularly an oily one that can block pores.

How long does it last?

Baby acne usually clears up within a few weeks, but it can linger for months. If it doesn’t clear up within three months, or you’re concerned about it, talk you’re your baby’s doctor.

What can you do about your baby’s complexion in the meantime?

Here are some dos and don’ts:

  • Don’t use over-the-counter acne medicines.
  • Don’t scrub. Baby acne isn’t caused by dirt. In fact, too much washing can further irritate your baby’s skin,
  • Don’t put oily lotions on your baby’s skin. These can make the acne worse. Most over the counter products contain harmful ingredients that sit on the surface of the skin clogging pores. Perfect Skin Naturally products are safe and effective….guaranteed.
  • Do: Simply wash your baby’s face with Perfect Skin Naturally Face & Body Wash and water once a day. Gently pat it dry.

Cradle cap

If your baby’s scalp has flaky, dry skin that looks like dandruff, or thick, oily, yellowish or brown scaling or crusting patches, it’s probably cradle cap. Doctors call it infantile seborrheic dermatitis, and it’s very common.

You might notice the same condition around your baby’s ears or eyebrows, on his eyelids, or even in his armpits and other creases.

What causes cradle cap?

The cause is unknown. But it is known that cradle cap is not caused by poor hygiene or allergies.

Some experts believe that the hormones a baby receives from his mother at the end of pregnancy overstimulate the baby’s oil-producing (seborrhea) glands, resulting in cradle cap. Irritation from a yeast that grows in the sebum (the substance produced by the glands) is also thought to be a possible culprit.

Cradle cap isn’t contagious. And it probably doesn’t bother your baby at all, although if it gets severe it might itch.

How should I treat my baby’s flaky scalp?

  • Gently massage your baby’s scalp with your fingers or soft wash cloth to loosen the scales.
  • Shampoo with Perfect Skin Naturally Face & Body Wash.   After shampooing, gently brush your baby’s scalp with a soft brush or a terrycloth towel.
  • Apply a small amount of Perfect Skin Naturally Cream.

Diaper Rash

What does diaper rash look like?

If your child’s diaper area looks irritated and red, chances are it’s diaper rash. The skin may also be a little puffy and warm when you touch it. Diaper rash can be mild – a few prickly red spots in a small area – or extensive, with tender red bumps that spread to your child’s tummy and thighs.

Diaper rash doesn’t mark you as a negligent parent. Dealing with diaper rash is part and parcel of childcare, especially in the first year or so of your child’s life.

How did my child get diaper rash?

Diaper rash can be caused by anything from a new food to your child’s own urine. Here are the most likely causes:

Wetness. Even the most absorbent diaper leaves some moisture on your child’s skin. And when your child’s urine mixes with bacteria from his stool, it breaks down and forms ammonia, which can be very harsh. That’s why children with frequent bowel movements or diarrhea are more prone to diaper rash.

Although a child left in a dirty diaper for too long is more likely to develop diaper rash, any child with sensitive skin can get a rash, even if his parents are diligent diaper changers.

Chafing or chemical sensitivity. Your child’s diaper rash may be the result of his diaper rubbing against his skin, especially if he’s particularly sensitive to chemicals like the fragrances in a disposable diaper or the detergents used to wash a cloth diaper. It could also be that a lotion or powder you’re using at diaper time doesn’t agree with your child’s skin.

New foods. It’s common for children to get diaper rash when they start eating solid foods or are introduced to a new food. Any new food changes the composition of the stool. (The acids in certain foods, such as strawberries and fruit juices, can be especially troublesome for some kids.) A new food might increase the frequency of your child’s bowel movements as well. If you’re breastfeeding, your child’s skin could even be reacting to something you’re eating.

Infection. The diaper area is warm and moist — just the way bacteria and yeast like it. So it’s easy for a bacterial or yeast infection to flourish there and cause a rash, especially in the cracks and folds of your child’s skin. (Thrush is a type of oral yeast infection. Some children with thrush develop a yeast infection in their diaper area, too.)

Antibiotics. Children on antibiotics (or whose breastfeeding mothers are on antibiotics) sometimes get yeast infections because these drugs reduce the number of healthy bacteria that help keep yeast in check as well as the harmful bacteria they’re meant to destroy. Antibiotics can also cause diarrhea, which can contribute to diaper rash.

Should I take my child to the doctor for a diaper rash?

Do call the doctor if the rash looks as though it may be infected. (Signs of infection include blisters, pus-filled pimples, oozing yellow patches, or open sores.)

Also call the doctor if your child develops a fever or her rash doesn’t go away after several days of home treatment.

What’s the best way to treat diaper rash?

Take these steps to heal your child’s skin when you see a diaper rash:

  • Keep your child clean and dry by changing his diaper frequently. That may mean getting him up at night for a diaper change.
  • Rinse his diaper area well at each diaper change. Don’t use wipes that contain alcohol or fragrance. Some parents keep cotton balls and a squirt bottle or an insulated container of warm water at the changing table for easy, gentle cleanups.
  • Pat your child’s skin dry — don’t rub!
  • Apply a small amount of Perfect Skin Naturally Cream with every diaper change. Put your child’s diaper on loosely or use a diaper that’s a little big on him to allow for better air circulation. If you buy disposables, try a different brand to see if that helps. There are varieties for sensitive skin, for example, and extra-absorbent options will pull more moisture away from your child’s skin.
  • When the weather is warm and your child can play outside or in a room with a floor that’s easy to clean, leave his diaper (and ointment) off for as long as possible every day. Exposure to the air will speed healing.
  • Wash with Perfect Skin Naturally Face and Body Wash.  Most soap contains harsh chemicals, which irritate and may also be causing diaper rash. Perfect Skin Naturally Face and Body Wash is gentle and safe for even the most sensitive newborn skin.

How can I prevent diaper rash?

Here are some good preventive measures:

  • The best defense against diaper rash is a dry bottom, so change your child’s diaper frequently or as soon as possible after it becomes wet or soiled.
  • Clean your child’s genital area thoroughly with each diaper change.
  • Pat her skin dry — never rub it. You might also try drying the diaper area after a diaper change with a hair dryer set on low.
  •  If your child seems prone to diaper rash, coat the baby’s bottom with a thin layer of  Perfect Skin Naturally Cream after each diaper change.
  • When your child starts eating solid foods, introduce one item at a time. Waiting a few days between each introduction will make it easier to determine whether sensitivity to the food causes a diaper rash. If it does, you can eliminate that food for the time being.
  • Don’t secure the diaper so tightly that there’s no room for air to circulate. Dress your child in loose clothing.
  •  Don’t wash cloth diapers with detergents that contain fragrances, and skip the fabric softener. Both can irritate your child’s skin. Use hot water and double rinse your child’s diapers. You might also add half a cup of vinegar to the first rinse to eliminate alkaline irritants.
  • Breastfeed your child for as long as you can. Breastfeeding boosts your child’s resistance to infections in general and makes her less likely to need antibiotics, which can contribute to diaper rash.
  • When your child does need to take an antibiotic, ask the doctor about giving her a pro-biotic as well. Probiotics encourage the growth of healthy bacteria in the gut, which may reduce your child’s chances of getting a diaper rash.

Eczema

What is eczema?

Eczema (also called atopic dermatitis) is a skin rash that usually appears before age 5. In babies it tends to show up on the cheeks and scalp, but it may spread to the arms, legs, chest, or other parts of the body. After a child’s first year, it’s most likely to show up on the insides of the elbows, the backs of the knees, the wrists, and the ankles, but it can also appear elsewhere.

The rash might look like dry, thickened, scaly skin, or it might be made up of tiny red bumps that ooze or become infected if scratched. Scratching can also cause thickened, darkened, or scarred skin over time.

Eczema typically comes and goes. It isn’t contagious, but because it’s intensely itchy, it can be very uncomfortable, and scratching can be a problem. If untreated, the rash can be unsightly, so it may present a social challenge for a child, too.

Your doctor can diagnose eczema by examining your child’s skin.

What causes eczema?

Eczema is not an allergic reaction to a substance, but allergens or irritants in the environment (such as pollen or cigarette smoke) can trigger it. Less frequently, it can be triggered by allergens in your child’s diet – or in your diet if your child is breastfeeding.

The rash can also be aggravated by heat, irritants that come in contact with the skin (like wool or the chemicals in some soaps, fragrances, lotions, and detergents), changes in temperature, and dry skin. Stress can also trigger a flare-up of eczema.

How common is eczema?

About 20 percent of babies and young children have eczema. It usually starts in infancy, with 65 percent of patients developing symptoms in the first year of life and 90 percent developing symptoms before age 5.

There’s no way to know ahead of time whether a child will outgrow eczema, but fortunately the condition usually becomes less severe with age. Many children outgrow eczema by age 2, and many others outgrow it by adulthood.

What can I do about my child’s eczema?

Taking good care of your child’s skin and avoiding triggers can help treat and prevent flare-ups.

Skin-care tips

Bathing and moisturizing

Talk with the doctor about how often to bathe your child. Many experts now believe that daily bathing can be helpful for children with eczema. Just don’t make the water too warm, because very warm water dries out the skin faster than lukewarm water.

Use Perfect Skin Naturally Face & Body Wash and Cream at bath time. As soon as you get your child out of the tub, pat (don’t rub) excess water from his skin with a soft towel or washcloth.

Then, while the skin is still damp, promptly apply a liberal amount of Perfect Skin Naturally Cream to your child’s skin.

Miniaturization is key to alleviating symptoms of atopic dermatitis and eczema. A paper appearing in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine online on July 15 noted three studies showing sunflower seed oil to be a cost-effective moisturizer for infants. It is thought to work as an anti-inflammatory and improve the skin barrier.   The paper also notes that virgin coconut oil was shown to act as a moisturizer, an anti-inflammatory, and an antibacterial, as well. “Coconut oil has anti-staph properties and can limit superficial colonization of wounds, like in eczema, Dr. Rupani said.  American Academy of Dermatology approved.

Allow skin to breathe and stay cool

Dress your child in smooth natural fabrics, like cotton. Avoid wool and other scratchy materials, which can irritate very sensitive skin. Don’t overheat your child by bundling him up more than necessary.

Soaps and cleansers

Use mild, fragrance-free detergent for washing clothes and bedding. Don’t use fabric softeners.

Try preventing scratching

Scratching and rubbing can further irritate or inflame the skin and make matters much worse.

One of the key ingredients in Perfect Skin Naturally Products contains is a botanical from New Zealand called Cehami.  It is a powerful natural analgesic that stops pain and itch on contact.

Avoiding triggers

  • Rapid changes in temperature can make eczema worse, so try not to let your child get too hot and then cool quickly, or vice versa.
  • Keep your child away from cigarette smoke.
  • Try to identify and minimize any stressors that may be triggering the eczema. Do what you can to help your child deal with stress (such as providing your little one with more quiet time or helping your grade-schooler prepare for a test).

Heat Rash (Prickly Heat)

What is heat rash?

Heat rash (Prickly Heat) is a red or pink rash usually found on body areas covered by clothing. It can develop when the sweat ducts become blocked and swell and often leads to discomfort and itching. Heat rash is most common in babies, but it may affect adults in hot, humid climates.

What causes heat rash?

In babies, heat rash can be caused by well-meaning parents who dress their baby too warmly, but it can happen to any baby in very hot weather. A baby should be dressed as an adult would be to be comfortable at the same temperature and activity level. Babies’ hands and feet may feel cool to your touch but that does not mean they need to be dressed too warmly in hot weather.

What are the symptoms of heat rash?

Heat rash looks like dots or tiny pimples. In young children, heat rash can appear on the head, neck, and shoulders. The rash areas can get irritated by clothing or scratching, and, in rare cases, a secondary skin infection may develop.

How is heat rash diagnosed?

Heat rash can usually be identified by its appearance and does not usually require medical attention. But if it doesn’t go away after 3 or 4 days, or if it appears to be getting worse, or if your child develops a fever, contact your doctor right away.

What is the treatment for heat rash?

Most prickly heat rashes heal on their own. The following steps can help relieve symptoms.

  • Start by removing or loosening your baby’s clothing and move him or her to a cool, shady spot.
  • Let the skin air-dry instead of using towels.

The following tips can help prevent future episodes of the rash:

  • Dress your child in as few clothes as possible during hot weather.
  • Keep the skin cool and dry.
  • Keep the sleeping area cool.

After the rash is gone, gradually expose your child to warmer temperatures so that his or her skin can acclimate.

When should you call a doctor?

Always call a doctor if you have any concerns, if your baby is not acting normally, or if the skin shows signs of being infected. The signs can include:

  • Increased pain, swelling, or warmth in an area.
  • Red streaks extending from an area.
  • Pus.
  • Swollen lymph nodes in the neck, armpit, or groin.
  • Fever of 100.4 °F (38 °C) or higher.
  • An extra fussy baby.